0845 40 80 639
Email Us
my profile my membership details seating requests bring guest (pay for) invite guest (via email) send substitute arrange 1-2-1
case studies
people we work with - verbatim business networking podcast resources
connectors club event structure nrg group leader sponsorship the nrg team nrg videos
Show AllBusiness Networking BlogBusiness Networking ArticlesMastermind BlogMember StoriesNRG Expert SpeakersBusiness ArticlesMember Offerings & EventsNRG Advocacy Training - The BasicsNRG Advocacy Training - Practical Steps
Show AllBathBristolLondonMetropolitan LondonMetropolitan London CitySwindonWorcester

Member Login

Subscribe

Testimonials

"NRG networks run lunchtime networking meetings with a difference. The format is relaxed and friendly, but very professionally organised and focused on business education and building relationships."

Colin Newlyn


Verbatim Call Handling Service - Proud Sponsors of NRG

Business Networking Blog

Making notes of meetings
I went to a presentation some time ago when the presenter shared a method that he used for taking notes. I've combined his advice for using colours with mind mapping so that I can instantly look at my notes and see what actions I have agreed to take. I find this essential in that all important business networking follow up.

Sine then I make notes with mind maps using a four coloured pen with blue for data, red for action, green if something needs fixing & black if there is real drama present.


If I'm writing on someone's business card I generally use red & blue. It's easy then to identify the actions I have agreed.

Good Networking!
Dave Clarke
Business Networking Blog > Posted by Dave Clarke at 17:40:00, 10 May 07
Tags: Business Networking,Other,NRG,Networking Follow Up
52777 Views 0 Comments

Share
Educate, educate, educate
I attended an excellent marketing masterclass by Nigel Temple this evening. One of the points he made about differentiation was the importance of freely sharing useful information in your marketing. He said it was better to be seen as an expert than to just claim you are. His point is illustrated beautifully by the amount of free resources at his own website, nigeltemple.com.

It reminds me of a quote from an NRG member in some research into business networking that NRG conducted a couple of years ago:

"I do not do any cold calling - all my business comes from networking and referrals. Much of it is as a result of doing a presentation where I share my secrets so people know how to do what I do. Mostly, they prefer to ask me to do it for them, even though I've explained how they can do it for themselves! Networking is not about selling - it's about building relationships."

This demonstrates nicely how Nigel's good advice applies equally in the relationship building context in business networking.

Good Networking!
Dave Clarke
Business Networking Blog > Posted by Dave Clarke at 22:54:00, 09 May 07
Tags: How Networking Works,NRG,Networking Relationships,Managing reputation
43115 Views 0 Comments

Share
"How Can I help you?"
I was at the NRG Networking Lunch in London today and our table moderator posed the same question to each person, "How can we help?". The answers that stimulated the most activity were the ones from members who had been building their relationships in the network, and who were specific with their requests.

One person said he was interested in meeting printing companies interested in joint venturing. Two introductions were offered immediately.

Another person was interested in bespoke software developers with Property clients and received three immediate introductions.

Assuming you have those good relationships in place do you know how to ask specifically for what you want?

Good Networking!
Dave Clarke
Business Networking Blog > Posted by Dave Clarke at 19:47:00, 08 May 07
Tags: How Networking Works,NRG,Networking Relationships,Networking Introductions
53674 Views 0 Comments

Share
How do I get access to someone's clients?
How often have I heard NRG members ask this question? The last time was a few days ago at an NRG Xtra meeting where one of the attendees was asking help as to how he got access to an accountant's clients. He said he always found accountants very reserved about giving access to their clients.

Sound familiar?

We discussed this and came to the following conclusions:

1. Nobody is prepared to give access to their contact list unless they have formed a trusted relationship with you.

2. Always give before you ask - find a way to give them something of value - with no strings attached. Form the relationship based upon what you can do for the other person.

3. It takes time and effort to develop such a relationship.

As it happened the person who raised the issue had already made an offer of a free part of his service to the accountant - who was delighted! He was proving that business networking is all about developing business relationships first!

Good networking!

Martin Davies
Business Networking Blog > Posted by Dave Clarke at 8:27:00, 07 May 07
Tags: Business Networking,How Networking Works,Networking for Advocates,NRG,Networking Relationships
46533 Views 0 Comments

Share
When should I offer a 'freebie'?
I was having a 1-2-1 meeting with a new NRG member, who was in the Internet Services business. He asked me "I never know whether it's OK to offer a free traffic analysis of their website to someone I've met when networking - I'm worried they'll think me pushy and think it's a sales ploy."

My answer was that it depended on how you set the scene. I thought it was fine if you introduced the offer in the context that you were trying to increase your visibility in business, really wanted to educate people you met about what you did and the best way was to show them - hence the offer.

The key thing in business networking is to make sure the offer is without strings - none of us likes to feel beholden.

Good networking!

Martin Davies
Business Networking Blog > Posted by Dave Clarke at 22:21:00, 05 May 07
Tags: Business Networking,Networking Connections,NRG,Networking Relationships,Networking Objectives,Networking Introductions,Managing reputation
46403 Views 0 Comments

Share
What’s your NRG? Part Two.
In “What’s your NRG? Part One” I introduced the concept of Networking Reliability Grade, the trust levels required for different value networking transactions.

These levels move from 1 to 6. NRG level 1 is where no trust is required and NRG level 6 is where complete trust is required. These NRG levels indicate increasing levels of trust. These levels with an example of a networking transaction for each:

NRG Level 1 – Swap business cards at a networking event
NRG Level 2 - Arrange an informal meeting to get to know each other
NRG Level 3 - Invite someone to come along to your regular networking group
NRG Level 4 - Actively look for potential referral opportunities for a contact
NRG Level 5 - Arrange a meeting to introduce 2 of your contacts to each other
NRG Level 6 - Provide a testimonial for a contact to another trusted contact

Putting this all together gives us an insight into the strategies employed in building trusted business relationships and ultimately a network of advocates. More on that later…

If you know anyone who attends lots of networking events & collects lots of business cards, but is getting nowhere then they are operating almost entirely at NRG level 1.

Good Networking!
Dave Clarke
Business Networking Blog > Posted by Dave Clarke at 15:02:00, 04 May 07
Tags: How Networking Works,Networking for Advocates,NRG
52120 Views 0 Comments

Share
What’s your NRG? Part One.
In this context NRG stands for Networking Reliability Grade and is used for the trust levels identified as key stages in the business networking research we did a couple of years ago.

The ultimate in relationship networking is when someone introduces you to a prospect for your product or service and introduces you as the person they simply must do business with. An ‘advocate’ introduction of this sort will only happen when you have built a business relationship based on complete trust.

In the research we established that trust is built through networking transactions and as the transaction value increases it is necessary for your trustworthiness or Networking Reliability Grade (NRG) to increase. Providing you perform well during networking transactions your NRG increases.

NRG levels move from 1 to 6. NRG level 1 is where no trust is required and NRG level 6 is where complete trust is required.

An example of a networking transaction where you only need NRG level 1 would be a simple introduction at an event.

An example of a networking transaction where you need NRG level 6 would be the ultimate described above.

I’ll introduce the other levels and some examples over the coming days together with what you have to do to move from NRG Level 1 to NRG Level 6.

Good Networking!
Dave Clarke
Business Networking Blog > Posted by Dave Clarke at 17:58:00, 03 May 07
Tags: How Networking Works,Networking for Advocates,NRG
47285 Views 0 Comments

Share
Hey this networking stuff really does work....
Just found this post from Phil Parr of the branding agency twentyfive on Ecademy; "Hey this networking stuff really does work...."

Phil said, "After 18 months of hard networking, doing the lunches, going to the breakfasts, making time for 1-2-1 meetings and presenting seminars, I am finally starting to get referrals in to companies that are not only right in terms of size and turnover but are ready to do the serious deep level branding that we do!

I have to admit to a bit of a crisis in confidence a couple of months ago - I even thought of cutting right back on the activity (it just seemed like so much effort with no reward) but I stuck in there and it's proved to be the right decision.

So all you people out there who may be wavering - here's my advice: Stick it out, it may take some time, but the referrals are out there."


Phil's absolutely right. It does take time to build relationships and your reputation, but that's where it pays off. I suspect if all he had been doing were the meetings then he would still be waiting.

Good Networking!
Dave Clarke
Business Networking Blog > Posted by Dave Clarke at 16:24:00, 02 May 07
Tags: How Networking Works,NRG,Networking Relationships,Managing reputation
52197 Views 0 Comments

Share
It's who you know!
I am writing this after just collecting my laptop from a friend...

I live about 80 miles West of London and often get the train to attend meetings and events there. Yesterday morning I attended the launch of a new business in Central London. I had a meeting arranged in Reading (Berkshire) at lunchtime so I parked in Reading and got the train to and from London. On the return journey I left my bag on the train.

I called the train company with no luck. I called their lost property company and then the station with the final destination (Bristol). I learned that I wouldn't be able to find out until at least 6 hours later whether the bag had been handed in or not. I called my wife to get the number of a friend of ours who is a train driver with the train company concerned. By coincidence he was on his way to Bristol to start work and got there as my bag was being delivered to the lost property office. Panic over. A couple of weeks ago I helped him with a problem with a new computer and the beers were on him. The beers are definitely on me this time :-)

Good Networking!
Dave Clarke
Business Networking Blog > Posted by Dave Clarke at 7:16:00, 02 May 07
Tags: How Networking Works,Other
47822 Views 0 Comments

Share
Simple rule of thumb guide to networking 2
I've been thinking about a previous post, a simple rule of thumb guide to networking. In it I recalled a post on ecademy where I had written: "Ask yourself what you would like people in your Network to do for you, then take the initiative and do it for them".

In some instances people may not want what you want so a better rule of thumb might be:

"Ask yourself what people in your Network would like, then take the initiative and do it for them"

Good Networking!
Dave Clarke
Business Networking Blog > Posted by Dave Clarke at 22:22:00, 30 Apr 07
Tags: How Networking Works,NRG,Networking Follow Up
59999 Views 0 Comments

Share


pages : 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39